Morning Notes

15/01/2015 Argonaut Morning Note

Stock markets around the world tumbled, with the Dow industrials falling to their lows of the year, and government bonds rallied Wednesday as fears about the health of the global economy deepened. Investors have been concerned about softness in Europe, Japan and China for months. And while U.S. growth has remained buoyant, it is unclear whether it can withstand the drag from overseas. Slower economic growth dims the prospects for corporate profit growth, a driver of stock-market gains. The Dow dropped 187 points, or 1.1%, to 17,427 and the S&P 500 lost 12 points, or 0.6%, to 2,011.

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14/01/2015 Argonaut Morning Note

U.S. stocks erased sharp gains Tuesday, though technology shares held up better than broader indexes. Stocks turned lower in afternoon trading, after a steep morning rally. Traders pointed to worries about the outlook for European Central Bank policy, though the U.S. declines started after European stocks closed broadly higher. Investors broadly expect the ECB to introduce new stimulus, and traders are closely following the outlook for European policy makers.

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13/1/2015 Argonaut Morning Note

U.S. stocks fell Monday, dragged lower by a renewed drop in oil prices, as investors turned to the coming fourth-quarter earnings season. The Dow Jones Index declined 0.5% (97 points) to 17,641 and the S&P 500 dropped 0.8% (17 points) to 2,028.

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12/01/2015 Argonaut Morning Note

US stocks have dropped, following European equity markets lower, after a mixed jobs report and another decline in oil prices. The Dow Jones Industrial Average sank 170.50 points (0.95 per cent) to 17,737.37, concluding a volatile week in which the blue-chip index registered triple-digit moves all five days. The broad-based S&P 500 fell 17.33 (0.84 per cent) to 2,044.81, while the tech-rich Nasdaq Composite Index lost 32.12 (0.68 per cent) at 4,704.07. The US economy added a solid 252,000 jobs in December, but analysts expressed worries at weak wage growth.

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